Dangers of the Known World

Russian Popular Belief from 1800

 

NEW COLLEGE SYMPOSIUM

 Organised by:

Professor Catriona Kelly

in association with

EHRC, University of Oxford

 

 

Tuesday 21 October 2003

 New College, Oxford, McGregor-Matthews Room

 

Programme:

 

11.00 a.m.    

Welcome and Introduction

11.15 a.m.    

Professor Faith Wigzell, ‘The Afterlife in Russian Popular Orthodoxy’

Chair/discussant:            Dr Stephen Lovell, King’s College, London

12.30 p.m.     

Buffet Lunch

2.00 p.m.    

Professor Steve Smith, ‘The Bolsheviks and the Struggle against “Superstition”, 1917-1941’

Chair/discussant:            Dr Daniel Beer, Downing College, Cambridge

3.15 p.m.    

Break 

3.30 p.m.     

Professor Caroline Humphrey, ‘The Folk Culture of Modernity in Soviey Russia’

Chair/discussant:           Dr Polly Jones, Worcester College, Oxford

4.45 p.m.     

Tea in the Founder’s Library

5.30 p.m.     

Professor Albert Baiburin, ‘Concepts of the Word and Language in Russian Traditional Culture’ [Слово в русской традиционной культуре] - Ilchester Lecture

Introduced by Professor Catriona Kelly (comments available here in PDF)

6.30 p.m.           

Drinks Reception

                        

 

 Participants:

Albert Baiburin is Professor of Ethnology at the European University of St Petersburg, and Distinguished Fellow of the Kunstkamera Museum of Ethnology and Anthropology, Russian Academy of Sciences. He is the author of many publications on Russian and East Slavonic traditional culture, including Ritual in Traditional Culture (1993), and has been awarded the President’s Prize for Research. He is currently working on a study of the word and language in Russian traditional culture.

Caroline Humphrey is Professor of Asian Anthropology in the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of the British Academy. Her books include numerous monographs and edited volumes about traditional culture and society in Inner Asia, as well as, most recently, The Unmaking of Soviet Life: Everyday Economies after Socialism (Cornell University Press, 2002), and Markets and Moralities: Ethnographies of Postsocialism (Berg, 2002) (an edited collection of essays). Her current research is on the changing language of politics in post-socialist Mongolia.

Steve Smith is Professor of History at the University of Essex. He has written on many aspects of the inter-relationship of politics, culture and society in late-imperial and early Soviet Russia and on republican China. Recent publications include a two-volume study of society and politics in Shanghai (Duke University Press, 2000-2002), and The Russian Revolution: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2002). He is currently working on a project that compares efforts by Communist regimes in Russia and China to extirpate 'superstitious' beliefs and practices.

Faith Wigzell is Professor of Russian Literature and Culture at the School of Slavonic Studies, University College, London. She has published widely on Russian medieval culture, nineteenth-century literature and folklore, including Reading Russian Fortunes: Print Culture, Gender and Divination in Russia from 1765 (Cambridge University Press, 1998). She is currently working on a study of Russian folk beliefs about the future, supported by a Research Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust.

Professor Baiburin’s visit to the UK was sponsored by the British Academy under its Visiting Professorships Scheme, and by the Ilchester Fund of the Taylor Institution, University of Oxford. We are grateful to these institutions, and to the European Humanities Research Centre, the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages, University of Oxford, and the Warden and Fellows of New College, for their support.

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